Academic reading practice test 24

Academic reading practice

Academic reading practice

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ielts fever listening practice test 24 zip

[shc_shortcode class=”shc_mybox”]14. at one’s wit’s end – anxious, frantic. I need to speak with him to
finish the report by tomorrow but he’s not available. I’m at my wit’s end!
15. at the end of one’s rope – desperate, with nowhere to turn. I’ve
tried every which way to figure out this problem but I can’t. I’m at the
end of my rope!
16. back on one’s feet – financially or physically healthy again. Since
sales improved, he is doing better and he’s getting back on his feet.
17. back out of – withdraw, end an obligation or promise. I made a
deal with my friend to help him at work. When I became too busy, I
had to back out of it.
18. back to the drawing board – rethink an idea, need to start
over. When my supervisor told me that our idea would not work, we
had to go back to the drawing board to come up with something else.
19. backbone – courage. He has no backbone because he was afraid to
reprimand her.
20. backseat driver – passenger who tells you how to drive. I’ll never
drive Joe to the airport again. He kept on wanting me to take another
road which I knew was wrong. He is such a backseat driver.
21. bail one out – help. Thanks for picking me up when my car broke
down. You really bailed me out of a bad situation.
22. ballpark figure – approximate amount. When I asked the
contractor how much it would be to remodel the kitchen, he gave me a
ballpark figure.
23. bang for the buck – value for the money spent. Newspaper
advertising works well for us because we get the best bang for the buck.
24. bank on it – be sure of, count on. I’ll be there to help you.
You can bank on it.
25. banker’s hours – short work hours. He loves his job because on
Friday, he gets to work banker’s hours.
26. bark up the wrong tree – make a wrong choice or a false
assumption. If he thinks that I’m going to help him paint his house,
well he’s barking up the wrong tree.
27. bat a thousand – have a perfect record. He is so happy that
everyone he invited to the party is coming. He’s batting a thousand.
28. bat an eyelash – show emotion. He was filled with emotion during
his speech, but she didn’t bat an eyelash.

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29. bawl out – reprimand. The team was bawled out after they lost the
game.
30. be beside one’s self – be very upset. I was so mad when I heard
that she was making up stories about me that I was beside myself.
31. beat around the bush – avoid giving a clear answer. I didn’t want
to hurt his feelings and tell him that he wasn’t selected for the team.
So when he asked me if I had any information, I basically beat around
the bush.
32. beat someone to the punch – do something before someone else
can. She was going to buy the last red dress that the store had, but I
beat her to the punch and bought it first.
33. beat the rap – escape punishment. There was not enough evidence
to convict him, so he beat the rap and was set free.
34. behind the 8-ball – in trouble. My department is late on its
deadline. We are behind the 8-ball.
35. bend over backwards – try very hard. He’ll bend over backwards
to help any of his friends.
36. bide one’s time – wait patiently for the right opportunity. I’m just
going to bide my time. I know that eventually a position will open.
37. big shot – important person. Since he was given a promotion, he’s
been acting like a big shot.
38. big stink – an angry and loud complaint. She made a big stink when
her meal was served cold.
39. birds and bees – facts about sex and birth. The girl’s mother told
her daughter about the birds and the bees during the summer holidays.[/shc_shortcode]

 

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