Most Common idioms used in IELTS Exam Part 2 IELTS EXAM

0
68
Did you like the post rate the post

Most Common idioms used in IELTS Exam Part 2

dressed to kill – wear one’s finest clothing. She was dressed to kill
when I saw her at the convention last year.
 dribs and drabs – little by little, small quantities. She told us the
story in dribs and drabs.
drive at – try to say, insinuate. What were you driving at when you
said that insulting comment?
drive someone up a wall – make someone crazy. My son is
driving me up a wall!
 drop in the bucket – a small amount. The cost of fixing the sink
is a drop in the bucket compared to replacing the whole sink.
 drop out – one who doesn’t complete a study course. My cousin
dropped out of college.
drown one’s sorrows – drink liquor to forget one’s problems. I
was so upset last night, that I drowned my sorrows at the bar.
dump – get rid of, reject – I can’t believe you dumped your girlfriend.
dwell on – talk and think about something all the time. I know it is
a big decision, but you shouldn’t dwell on it all day.
 eager beaver – ambitious, hard working. Charlie gets to work at
7:00 am everyday. He is an eager beaver.
earful – interesting gossip, information. My friend found out about
the local politician. I got an earful.
 egg someone on – push, urge. My wife didn’t want to take the job,
but I egged her on.
elbow grease – strength for cleaning. I needed to use a lot of elbow
grease to get the dirt off the floor.
elbow room – enough space to be comfortable. It was so tight in
that restaurant. There wasn’t any elbow room.
end up – finish. I heard that you got lost on your way home last
night. Where did you end up?
 every Tom, Dick and Harry – the average person, nobody
special. It seemed like every Tom, Dick and Harry came out to
purchase tickets for the movie.
 face the music – meet one’s punishment, accept the consequences.
When he got caught stealing the money from the bank, he realized
that soon he would have to face the music.
face up to – accept something unpleasant or difficult. You need to
face up to the fact that you did not win the election.
fair and square – honest, honestly. I won the contest fair and square.
 fall apart – stop working properly, deteriorate. His old car
finally fell apart.
 fall behind – not be able to keep up, fail to maintain a schedule or
rate of speed. When she couldn’t go to school because of her illness,
she significantly fell behind in her work.
 fall for – begin to love, have strong emotions for. I fell for her as
soon as I met her.
 fall off – decrease. Sales have been falling off since the economy
has slowed down.
 fall through fail, collapse – The big sale I made at work
yesterday fell through this morning.
false alarm – warning or report that is untrue. She thought that
she was pregnant, but it was a false alarm.
 far-fetched – unlikely, exaggerated. The possibility of her receiving
a full scholarship is very far-fetched.
 fast buck – money obtained easily and often unethically. I know a way
we can make a fast buck.
 feather in one’s cap – proud achievement. His speech went well
at the corporate meeting. It was a feather in his cap.
fed up with – had enough, disgusted with. She was fed up with his
attitude at the office.
 feel in one’s bones – know by intuition, feel certain without
evidence. I believe he is going to get the promotion. I can just feel it in
my bones.
feel like a million bucks – feel wonderful. I felt like a million
bucks when I wore my new suit to the wedding.
 feel like two cents – feel ashamed or embarrassed. I felt like two
cents when I dropped the birthday cake on the floor.
 feel sorry for – pity. She felt sorry for him when she heard the
news of his accident.
fender bender – minor accident. I had a fender bender on my way
to work this morning.
 fiddle around – work without a definite plan and knowledge. The
clock was broken, so he fiddled around with it until he got it to work.
 figure out – try to understand, solve. She couldn’t figure out one of
her math problems.
 fill someone in – tell a person the details. We had the meeting
yesterday when you were out. Let me fill you in on what you missed.
find fault – complain, criticize – She always seems to find fault with
any of my friends.
 fish out of water – someone who does not fit in. She felt like a
fish out of water when she went to the party in her formal dress while
everyone else was wearing jeans.
 fishy – suspicious, false sounding. Your company is giving you a
month off from work? That sounds a bit fishy.
 fix someone up – arrange a date for someone. I fixed her up with
my best friend.
 flip one’s lid – get angry, go crazy, become very excited. He flipped
his lid when he found out his son stole some candy from the store.
floor someone – surprise, confuse. I was floored when I found out
they had made me a surprise birthday party.
flop – failure – His business ended up being a flop.

 fly off the handle – get angry. Her mother flew off the handle
when she found out that her daughter dropped out of college.
 fly the coop – leave suddenly, run away. As soon as he turned
eighteen years old, he flew the coop.
 fly-by-night – unreliable, untrustworthy. I don’t want to buy my
computer from that store. It’s a fly-by-night company; they may not be
in business next year.
foot in the door – opening , hopeful beginning of success. It is
not my idea of a perfect job, but at least I have my foot in the door with
a great company.
 foot the bill – pay. Who is going to foot the bill for the
office renovations?
for a song – at a low price, cheap. He got his new car for a song.
for the birds – terrible, awful. I work long hours and hardly get
paid. This job is for the birds.
 for the time being – at the present time. For the time being, let’s
not make any changes to the report.
 free-for-all – mayhem, disorder. When the teacher left for a
meeting , it was a free-for-all in the classroom.
freeload – get things that others pay for. When my friend moved
into my apartment, stayed for a year and never contributed any money,
I knew he was a freeloader.

 from the bottom of one’s heart – with great feeling , sincerely.
My sister thanked me from the bottom of her heart for saving her dog’s life.
from the left field – unexpectedly, with an odd or unclear
connection to the subject. We were in the middle of a business
meeting when, out from left field, he asked about the weather.
from scratch – from the very beginning , starting with raw
materials. This chocolate was not made from a cake mix, she made it
from scratch.
fume – be angry. When I heard that she was talking about me to
other people, I was just fuming.
gall – shameless, insolent attitude. She spent all of her money on
clothes and music, and then she asked to borrow money for groceries.
She has gall.

 game – willing , ready. Okay, you want to make plans to go to China?
Okay, I’m game.
get a grip on oneself – take control of one’s feelings . When he
lost the soccer game, he couldn’t stop crying. I told him to get a grip
on himself.
get a kick out of – enjoy. I get a kick out of it every time I
see her dance.
get a load of – have a good look at. Get a load of those fancy cars
driving down the street.
get ahead – become successful. She is saving all her money, so that
one day she can get ahead.
 get along – manage. He realized that he was able to get along quite
well without his partner.
 get around to – finally find time to do something – I have put it
off for months, but I finally got around to cleaning the windows.
 get at – mean, hint. You tell me that I am slow at work. What are
trying to get at.
 get away with murder – not be punished for wrongdoing. – He’s
the boss’s son and comes in late everyday, but we can’t complain. He’s
getting away with murder.
get cold feet – be afraid at the last minute, lose confidence. I was
prepared to make a speech, but I got cold feet when I saw how many
people were going to hear it.
get down to brass tacks – begin important work or business.
Get off the phone so that we can discuss business. Let’s get down to
brass tacks.
 get even – get revenge, settle the score. I was so upset when she
insulted me last week. I want to get even with her.
 get the runaround – be sent from place to place without getting
the information needed. It took me four hours to renew my driver’s
license. I was sent to almost every department and seemed to get the
runaround.
get in on the ground floor – start from the beginning so you’ll
have full advantage of any favorable outcome. He is a very wealthy
man. He was one Microsoft’s first employees and got in on the
ground floor.

 get in the swing of things – adapt or adjust to a new
environment. After working two weeks in the new department, I
finally got into the swing of things.
get off the ground – make a successful beginning , go ahead. He
will finally take his project and get it off the ground in the coming year.
get off one’s back – leave someone alone, don’t bother. She
reminded me that I had to prepare for my trip out of town. I wish she
would get off my back.
 get off on the wrong foot – make a bad start. Having a fight
with a co-worker on my first day of work was not a good idea. I got off
on the wrong foot.
 get off the ground – make progress, make a good start. I finally
got my business off the ground.
get one’s goat – make someone disgusted, annoyed, angry. Sitting
in traffic for 5 hours really got my goat.
 get out from under – end a worrisome situation. I am glad that I
am working again and making money. I finally got out from under my bills.
 get out of – withdraw. I would really like to get out of going to the
holiday party.
get out of hand – lose control. The party really got out of hand
when they started drinking alcohol.
get something off one’s chest – unburden yourself, tell what’s
bothering you. I feel better ever since I told him my problem and got it
off my chest.
get the ax – be fired. My company finally realized that he wasn’t
doing his job. They gave him the ax.
get the show on the road – start a project or work. We have
been discussing unimportant things all morning. Let’s get the show on
the road and start getting down to business.
get to the bottom of – find out the real cause. After talking to
my friend for an hour, I finally got to the bottom of why he was angry at me.
get under someone’s skin – annoy, bother, upset. He has a
difficult and annoying personality and always got under my skin.
get up and go – ambition, energ y, enthusiasm – She always seems so
excited and motivated at work. She’s got a lot of get up and go.
get up on the wrong side of the bed – be in a bad mood. My
son has been cranky all day. I think he got up on the wrong side of the bed.
get what is coming to one – what one deserves, good or bad.
After stealing so much money from the charity, I really hope he gets
what’s coming to him.
 get wind of – find out, hear gossip or rumors about. I got wind of
the fact that they will be closing down our department.
give a hoot – care. I don’t give a hoot who wins the election.
 give the cold shoulder – be unfriendly to, ignore. I was so mad
at my cousin, that I gave her the cold shoulder at the
wedding reception.
 give in – do as others want, surrender. I wanted to paint the room
blue, my wife wanted yellow. I had to give in.
 give it one’s best shot – try very hard. I gave it my best shot, but
I still didn’t make the team.
 give someone a break – give someone an opportunity or chance.
The actor struggled for many years. Finally, someone gave him a break
and put him in a movie.
 give someone a hand – help. I couldn’t work my regular hours. A
co-worker gave me a hand and switched schedules with me.
give someone a piece of one’s mind – say what you really think
when angry. I was so mad that he was late for the wedding , I gave him
a piece of my mind.
 give someone his walking papers – dismiss, fire, send away.
She got her walking papers on Friday and won’t be coming
back to work.
 give someone the green light – give permission to go ahead
with a project. We were finally given the green light to begin setting up
the new project.
go cold turkey – stop abruptly. My doctor really wants me to quit
smoking. I decided to stop and go cold turkey.
go Dutch – each person pay for himself. If we have dinner together,
I insist that we go Dutch.
 go from bad to worse – deteriorate. Sales have been very slow
this season, but this was the worst week of all. It seems like it’s going
from bad to worse.
 go out of one’s way – make a special effort, do more than
necessary. I went out of my way to make it easier for you.
 go over – examine. Before I submit the report, I want to go over it
one more time for mistakes.
go over big – be very successful. Do you think my idea to have a
birthday party for our teacher will go over big?
go overboard – overact, be reckless. I’ve never seen so many
flowers at a wedding. Do you think maybe you’ve gone overboard?
go steady – go out with only one person romantically. Who did you
go steady with in high school?
 go to bat for – assist, help. I have overheard that she may be fired
from her job. I think she is a hard worker and I want her to stay. I’m
going to bat for her.
 go to pot – deteriorate, become undisciplined, unkempt. He has
quit his job, gained weight, and I think may be abusing drugs. It looks
like he’s really gone to pot.
 go under the knife – have surgery. I’ll be going under the knife
next week for some minor surgery.
go up in smoke – disappear, fail to materialize. She was going to go
on a vacation, but her mother got sick. Her plans have gone up
in smoke.
 go-getter – ambitious person. She is the most successful
salesperson I’ve ever seen. She’s a real go-getter.
 goldmine – worth a lot of money, successful. His business is a major
success and will only get bigger every year. He is sitting on a goldmine.
goner – someone in a lot of trouble. His boss found out he has been
stealing from the cash register. He’s a goner.
good sport – a person who loses well. Even though I beat you in
the game, you still congratulated me. You are a good sport.
goof off – not want to work, be lazy. I am tired of working so hard.
I just want to stay home and goof off.
 grab 40 winks – I felt so sleepy after my lunch, I decided to grab 40 winks.  

grand – $1000. It cost me a grand to stay in the luxury hotel.
greasy spoon – inexpensive restaurant with mediocre food. I hated
dinner last night. It turned out being a greasy spoon.
gung ho – enthusiastic, eager. He thinks his team is the best in the
league. He is really gung ho this season.
 guts – courage. He has a lot of guts to stand up to management.
 guy – man. That guy over there is my neighbor.
 half baked – foolish, silly. Opening up a store which sells only tape
will not be successful. It is a half baked idea.
hand it to someone – give credit, acknowledge. I’ve got to hand it
to you. Your idea to open a store in this location was great.
 hand over fist – rapidly. He’s making money hand over fist.
 hand something on a silver platter – give a person something
that has not been earned. His father is president of the university and
his education was handed to him on a silver platter.
 hand to mouth – barely able to cover basic expenses. That family
is struggling since the father lost his job. I hear that they’re living hand
to mouth.
 handful – a lot of trouble. My three year old runs around the house
and often breaks things. He’s a real handful.
 handle with kid gloves – be very careful, tactful. His wife gets
upset very easily. He has to handle her with kid gloves.
 handy – can fix things, useful. She’s very handy around the house. If
anything breaks, she can fix it easily.
 hang in there – be patient, wait. I know you want to quit school,
but hang in there. You only have 4 more weeks before your graduation.
 hard feelings – anger, bitterness. I know we had our differences,
but I hope there are not any hard feelings.
 hard up – in desperate need of something. Everyone comes to her
desk and takes supplies. I know she’s hard up for pencils.
harp on – dwell on the subject, repeat, persist. I know losing your
job was awful, but don’t harp on it. You are only making yourself more
depressed.
 has-been – a person once popular but no longer in public favor.
Since the movie star was found guilty of a crime, I haven’t seen him in
any motion pictures. He’s a has-been.
hassle – bother. Please stay home tonight. I don’t want the hassle of
having to bring you and pick you up from the party.

 have a ball – have a good time, enjoy one’s self. She had a ball at
her holiday party.
 have a crush on – be attracted to. I have had a crush on her since
5th grade.
 have a fit – become upset. She’ll have a fit if she finds out you broke
her watch.
 have a good head on one’s shoulders – be smart or sensible.
You have a good head on your shoulders and I’m sure you’ll do fine in college.
 have a mind of one’s own – be able to think independently.
Although we all voted one way, she voted in a completely opposite
direction. She’s really got a mind of her own.
 have a prayer – have a chance. He’s not good enough to make it on
the team. He doesn’t have a prayer.
 have been around – to be experienced, sophisticated. She knows
all about office politics. She has been around for awhile.
have egg on one’s face – be embarrassed. She called in sick to
work yesterday, but when I saw her at the store she had egg on her face.
 have it coming – deserve a punishment. I didn’t study for the exam
and I failed. I had it coming.
 have it made – be sure of success, have everything. Ever since she
won the lottery, she can do whatever she wants. She has it made.
have it out with someone – discuss a conflict or
misunderstanding with the other person involved. My friend and I
had a big fight last week. This morning I had it out with him and now
everything is okay.
have one’s feet on the ground – be practical, sensible, stable.
She’ll make a great wife and mother because she has got both feet
on the ground.
have one’s hand in the till – steal from one’s employer. The
reason he has been buying such nice new clothes is that he’s got his
hand in the till.Most Common idioms used in IELTS Exam Part 2 Most Common idioms used in IELTS Exam Part 2 Most Common idioms used in IELTS Exam Part 2 Most Common idioms used in IELTS Exam Part 2 Most Common idioms used in IELTS Exam Part 2 Most Common idioms used in IELTS Exam Part 2 Most Common idioms used in IELTS Exam Part 2

Most Common idioms used in IELTS Exam Part 2

Most Common idioms used in IELTS Exam Part 2

Most Common idioms used in IELTS Exam Part 2

Most Common idioms used in IELTS Exam Part 2

Most Common idioms used in IELTS Exam Part 2

Most Common idioms used in IELTS Exam Part 2

Most Common idioms used in IELTS Exam Part 2

Most Common idioms used in IELTS Exam Part 2

Most Common idioms used in IELTS Exam Part 2

Most Common idioms used in IELTS Exam Part 2

Most Common idioms used in IELTS Exam Part 2

Most Common idioms used in IELTS Exam Part 2

Most Common idioms used in IELTS Exam Part 2

Most Common idioms used in IELTS Exam Part 2

Most Common idioms used in IELTS Exam Part 2

Most Common idioms used in IELTS Exam Part 2

Most Common idioms used in IELTS Exam Part 2

Most Common idioms used in IELTS Exam Part 2

Most Common idioms used in IELTS Exam Part 2

Most Common idioms used in IELTS Exam Part 2

Most Common idioms used in IELTS Exam Part 2

 

 

Sending
User Review
0 (0 votes)

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here